The Polyphonic Spree: Trees 9th Anniversary

The Polyphonic Spree: Trees 9th Anniversary

Sealion, Cure for Paranoia

Sat, July 15, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$9

This event is all ages

The Polyphonic Spree
The Polyphonic Spree
When the Polyphonic Spree first appeared in 2000, the Dallas symphonic pop group was as much a band as a "happening," in the 1960s sense of the word. The Spree's two dozen members took the stage in flowing robes of snowy white, an appropriate backdrop for their happy and uplifting blend of pop, orchestral rock, and minimal touches of gospel. The costumes changed over the years, but the Polyphonic Spree's message remained consistent, drawing comparisons to the Flaming Lips and the Beach Boys with a smidgen of lively Godspell-like attitude thrown into the mix.

The Beginning Stages of the Polyphonic Spree The Polyphonic Spree were founded by vocalist Tim DeLaughter, who fronted the band Tripping Daisy until 1999, when a drug overdose killed his bandmate Wes Berggren. Tripping Daisy subsequently folded, and DeLaughter pulled together surviving members of the group for the Polyphonic Spree, a massive collective that admitted more than 20 new members into its fold. The group put together a demo entitled The Beginning Stages of the Polyphonic Spree and distributed it to fans during a holiday performance; a Dallas-based indie label, Good Records, later issued the release. Boasting a ten-member choir, two keyboardists, percussion, bass guitar, flute, trumpets, trombone, violin, French horn, theremin, pedal steel, and an electronic effects wizard, the band had little trouble carving out its own unique niche.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless MindDeLaughter emerged as the group's musical director and lead vocalist, and the Polyphonic Spree hit the road with more than a dozen full-sized vans. Despite the cumbersome nature of touring with an immense lineup, the band drew attention with its cathartic performances, including a gig during 2003's Reading Festival. The single "Follow the Day" was featured in Volkswagen commercials as well as the Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind soundtrack, which helped the Polyphonic Spree earn even more exposure. The group's proper debut, Together We're Heavy, was co-released by Good Records and Hollywood Records during the summer of 2004, garnering the Spree additional accolades despite a vicious review by Entertainment Weekly.

Wait Released in 2007, the Wait EP found the band moving in a darker, slightly more atmospheric direction, and the band returned that summer with The Fragile Army, a reprise of the vibrant Technicolor sound of its earlier work. The band now sported black military outfits with red crosses stitched onto the front, signaling a newfound darkness that flecked The Fragile Army with brief flashes of melancholy and textured rock. As before, the Polyphonic Spree took their tent revival-esque show on the road, and the Live from Austin TX CD/DVD captured their strength as a live act later that year. In 2012, the psych-pop extravaganza decided to take on the challenge of holiday music, releasing Holidaydream: Sounds of the Holidays, Vol. 1, which found the band putting its own exuberant spin on some classic Christmas standards. Continuing to color the pop culture world with their brand of vibrant psychedelia, the band took on a cult classic and released the live album, Songs From the Rocky Horror Picture Show, in 2013, as well as the studio album, Yes, It's True.
Sealion
Sealion
Art punk from Dallas, TX.

If Jean Michel Basquiat beat the shit out of Norman Rockwell we would be the blood on his knuckles.
Cure for Paranoia
Cure for Paranoia
Cure for Paranoia started with friends making music on a road trip. They were looking for doomsday shelter in a half-serious attempt to protect themselves from a comet rumored to be on a collision course with the earth. From there, they quickly started recording music everyday and performing live every night. By all accounts, Cure for Paranoia is one of the best groups to emerge out of Dallas in recent memory.

Like a commune or tribe, four musicians live under one roof in Oak Cliff and all they do is make music. In every way, Cure for Paranoia start their own group instead of joining someone else’s and the results are impressive. Some believe that bands should worry about oversaturation with live shows. But by demonstrating talent and dedication night after night, Cure for Paranoia quickly earned the respect of virtually every promoter, venue owner, and artistic director in North Texas’ music mecca, Deep Ellum—ask any of them.

Cameron McCloud is a hip-hop artist who looks like a ’60s rock star. Rapping with a thousand-yard stare and couture reminiscent of Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, or even Tom Waits, McCloud has a presence that is somehow both unapproachably intense and magnetic. His delivery is hyper and unpredictable. McCloud also has a fan in Erykah Badu. Backstage at The Bomb Factory in October, he approached the Queen of Neo-Soul and freestyled a verse for her in front of a
very large group of people. Naturally, it was caught on video and tens of thousands of people watched it online.

In February, Cure for Paranoia appeared at Badu’s sold-out birthday show at the Bomb Factory in front of a crowd of over 4,000. A month later, they returned to the venue for another sold-out show opening for Ludacris. Cure for Paranoia are a group of people addicted to music, and this is an infectious energy captured in their live shows and recordings. Stanley Francisko’s vocals bring an invaluable spirituality and pop sensibility to the group. JayAnalog and Tomahawk Jonez, also known as The Institute, compose and record all songs and provide live production during performances.

This is a wicked fusion of hip-hop, rock, pop, funk, and R&B built with an organic approach. Songs are figured out in equal parts while they are written, recorded, and performed live. It is not unusual for Cure of Paranoia to write a song in the afternoon, test it out in front of a crowd that night, and get back to work on it the next day.

Almost any night of the week, Cure for Paranoia can be seen performing live in Deep Ellum. They are featured on bills or showing up for weekly residencies at places like Drugstore Cowboy, High & Tight Barbershop, and one of the best places to hear live music from up-and- coming acts in the neighborhood, Three Links. On nights off, it is not unusual for Cure for Paranoia to perform on the street. It’s a surprisingly effective way to make new fans and spread the word about the next
show. They even met Grammy Award-winning producer Jah Born during one of these street performances and started collaborating with him.

“Normal Person” is a showcase of harmony, heavy beats, flawless production, wild mood swings, and musicality. A virtuosic mix of music genres is the perfect backdrop for the battle between McCloud’s steely enunciations as a rapper and the good vibes of Francisko’s vocals. McCloud is raw, Francisko could be a pop star, and they find common ground to make the most of their differences.

Through collaboration, audience interaction, and countless remixes, Cure for Paranoia is perfecting a self-titled album planned for a vinyl record release. In the meantime, you can hear these songs unfolding live. No two performances are the same and, as “Normal Person” demonstrates, Cure for Paranoia meticulously agonizes over songs until they have something special.
Venue Information:
Trees
2709 Elm Street
Dallas, TX, 75226
http://treesdallas.com/