Wayne Hancock

Wayne Hancock

Sam Anderson, Luke McGlathery, From Parts Unknown

Sun, July 2, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm (event ends at 12:30 am)

ADV $10

This event is all ages

Wayne Hancock
Wayne Hancock
Wayne has been called "The King of Juke Joint swing," a "Roots Renaissance Man," a "Country Singer's Country Singer" and "Hank Williams meets Gershwin." But the phrase most frequently echoed throughout his career is "Wayne Hancock is the real deal." Joe Ely said it, Hank Williams III said it, Bobby Koefer from the Texas Playboys said it, as have countless music fans and writers when referring to Hancock's authentic and original blend of honky tonk, western swing, blues and big band that he calls "juke joint swing!"

Authenticity and sincerity have been the cornerstones of Hancock's writing and music since the start of his career. His refusal to compromise his vision and sell out his music has earned him a fiercely loyal underground following.

Hancock's vision, as he puts it, is "to bring people together and make them feel good about music. It's a spiritual thing and without spirituality, you've got nothin'. There ain't much on the radio that strikes me as being original or from the heart, most of it's from the pocketbook and it shows."

Wayne is proud of his rural roots and culture and has thoroughly absorbed the spirit of country music's forefathers such as Ernest Tubb, Hank Williams and Jimmie Rodgers. Never a mere imitator, the cutting-edge style that emerges is every bit his own. He breathes youth and driving energy into traditional country forms and adds a dash of big band horns, boogie woogie piano, scorching rockabilly beats, heavenly Hawaiian steel licks and some wigged-out hillbilly jazz guitar.
Sam Anderson
Sam Anderson
"Good evening from Fort Worth, Texas." Those are the first words of out Sam Anderson and David Matsler's mouths on El Astronauta, The Quaker City Night Hawks' electrifying debut album for Lightning Rod Records, and it's the only introduction you'll need. Over a viscid, bluesy slide-guitar, the band transports you to the sweltering Texas heat, a "land of oilfields, iron nightmares, and fevered dreams." That song, "Good Evening," plants the band's flag firmly in the sand, simultaneously celebrating the pride of home and acknowledging the ominous clouds that hang over it, all while perfectly setting the stage for the raucous journey through time and space that follows.

The Night Hawks—Anderson and Matsler on vocals and guitars, Pat Adams on bass, and Aaron Haynes on drums—are a Southern band, to be sure, but it's not the South we've come to expect from our rock and roll. Equally influenced by ZZ Top and science fiction, they write of landscape both familiar and foreign, of a people working to shed their past but still burdened with its repercussions even in the distant future.

"Dave and I both pull from older artists when we write," says Anderson, "but we're trying to put a new spin on it. We're harkening back to old Texas, but we're writing about a new southern culture, maintaining the past and moving it on into the future."
Luke McGlathery
Luke McGlathery
nominated best songwriter and album of the year by fort worth weekly 2016
From Parts Unknown
From Parts Unknown
We drive a van and play loud songs. Some of our songs are louder than others. Cheers.
Venue Information:
Trees
2709 Elm Street
Dallas, TX, 75226
http://treesdallas.com/